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My top 3 to gather user feedback in an Oracle APEX app

Dimitri Gielis Blog - Tue, 03/13/2018 - 15:21
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In every Oracle APEX application we create, we add a feedback mechanism. We're not only doing this during the development phase, but we also leave it enabled in production.

We want to give the users the ability to give feedback to the team in a structured way. It should not be an hassle to give feedback, one click for the user where he can say what it's going; if he likes it, if something can be improved, if there's a bug... but at the same time we want as much info as possible at the time the user enters this feedback. What app are they in, which page are they on, what session information was there...

Most of the users really like to be heard and the feedback mechanism in our apps helped us a lot to engage with our customers.

Here're my top 3 ways of providing such feedback mechanism in an Oracle APEX app:

Feedback link and Team Development (pre APEX 18.1)

This method I started to use with Oracle APEX 4.2 and beyond. I blogged about using this feature here and here before.

In APEX you can create a new page; called the Feedback page. It will not only create a page, but also a navigation bar entry. Some screenshots of the wizard:

Which will result in:

I prefere to use the Modal dialog option as it feels more integrated in the app. This page is a normal APEX page, so you can further customise. For example you can make the Application and Page fields hidden.

The feedback that is entered is stored in Team Development - an area in APEX where you can do your project management.

Feedback feature in Blueprint and the new APEX 18.1 app creation wizard

In Oracle APEX 18.1 the application wizard got an overhaul and is now inline with the blueprint feature which was enabled previously on apex.oracle.com.

Enabling feedback is a matter of ticking a checkbox... and the result looks awesome to me :)

The user can share his feeling by selecting a smily, enter some feedback and include an attachment. When you use APEX 18.1, you will see the nice floating label (label inside box) for the feedback text item. Also when you submit feedback you get a nicer message that the feedback was submitted, instead that the dialog will automatically disappear as with the standard feedback page in 5.1 and earlier.

In Blueprint on apex.oracle.com and in APEX 5.2 EA1 (which became now APEX 18.1 EA2) the feedback was stored in its own table, but since APEX 18.1 EA2 the feedback is stored again in Team Development. In the Administration section there are a couple of screens that query the apex_team_feedback view. It looks like many of the Blueprint features that were showcased before, became native APEX features (e.g. email framework, feedback).

When clicking on User Feedback and the pencil you see the details for every entry.

You can enter a response which will update Team Development by using the APEX API  apex_util.reply_to_feedback.

What I find interesting is that APEX 18.1 made a change in their pages; it catalogs the pages now as Component or Feature. A feature contains more than just a page, so the Feedback page became the Feedback feature and will create more pages than just the feedback page itself. Just like if you click the box with Blueprint, it can add the administration section and navigation bar entry.

The feedback mechanism we knew in APEX 5.1 and before, got a nice update in Oracle APEX 18.1, it might be worth doing an upgrade once 18.1 hits production.
One nice addition would be the ability to add a screenshot and annotate the screen like Martin and I build a long time ago. It would save the user creating a screenshot and uploading the file.

Feedback with REST API

If you are using another issue or ticketing system it might be worthwhile to gather the feedback there. You can still create the feedback page, but add some additional processes (or replace the team development process) so the feedback is stored in your favourite tracking system like Bugzilla, Jira, Redmine and others. In the next section I'll show how to integrate with two issue tracking systems we use.

Oracle Developer Cloud Issues

In the projects where we use Oracle Exadata Express, we use Oracle Developer Cloud service, which you get with your Exadata Express account to manage our project.

The nice thing is that you have a Git repo and Issues all available and all the other things around to mange and streamline your project. In the feedback page I added a call to a PL/SQL procedure, so an issue is created whenever feedback is given.

The PL/SQL package I wrote to create an Oracle Developer Cloud issue:

Bitbucket Git Issues

When we started in 2015 with the development of APEX Office Print, we used Team Development in Oracle APEX to manage the development and for version control we used Bitbucket (Git repo). We use different technologies like PL/SQL, APEX, Node.js, Markdown, CSS and HTML. A bit later we decided to use the issues in Git for our node.js code as it made it easier to track an issue/feature and a certain commit (we enter the issue number when we commit).

Bitbucket has also some nice features to integrate Trello boards and Bitbucket cards.

At one stage I wanted to add all our Team Development features as Bitbucket issues, so I wrote a small script that calls the REST API and creates the issues for you:

Nothing stops you to add a process on your Feedback page in Oracle APEX to create a Bitbucket issue automatically. If you copy everything inside the for loop, you are golden.

I hope this post helps you to get user feedback... and don't hesitate to put in the comments what you do to engage with your users.

Improve Data Clustering on Multiple Columns Concurrently (Two Suns in the Sunset)

Richard Foote's Blog - Mon, 03/12/2018 - 08:30
I’ve had a couple of recent discussions around clustering and how if you attempt to improve the clustering of a table based on a column, you thereby ruin the current clustering that might exist for a different column. The common wisdom being you can only order the data one way and if you change the […]

Trivadis Performance Days 2018

Richard Foote's Blog - Thu, 03/08/2018 - 01:06
I’m very excited and privileged to be asked to present the opening and closing sessions at this year’s Trivadis Performance Training Days in Zurich, Switzerland on 19-20 September 2018. It’s one of the premier Oracle training events in Europe, one which I’ve always wanted to attend. This year has a fantastic lineup, so I’m really […]

My New David Bowie Blog

Richard Foote's Blog - Tue, 03/06/2018 - 23:11
Just a short note to say I’ve started a new blog that we focus on the one and only David Bowie: https://davidbowiewordpresscom.wordpress.com/ Those of you that only vaguely know me, know I’m a huge David Bowie fan, so I thought it might be a bit of fun to write about his extraordinary body of work. I’m […]

Oracle Database 18c: Introduction to Memoptimized RowStore (Memory of a Free Festival)

Richard Foote's Blog - Mon, 03/05/2018 - 05:29
One of the potentially cool new features introduced in Oracle Database 18c is the Memoptimized RowStore, designed to improve the performance and scalability of key-value based queries. A new pool in the SGA called the Memoptimize Pool can be configured to store specific heap tables that you may wish to optimize, in a manner not […]

Oracle Database 18c Indexing Related New Features (New Angels of Promise)

Richard Foote's Blog - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 04:29
Although the recently released Oracle 18c Database is really just under the covers, there are a few little features and enhancements that are of interest from an indexing perspective. These include: Memory Optimized Rowstore Scalable Sequences Oracle Text indexing enhancements, such as automatic background index maintenance and new optimize index options JSON Search Index […]

European Indexing Internals Seminar Events: Please Help Me Select (Station To Station)

Richard Foote's Blog - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 01:35
I’m currently determining which European countries to initially target for a series of my 2 day Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices seminars tentatively scheduled for the late May / early June time frame. The cost for the 2 day seminar is to be confirmed but will be approximately 1200 Euros (plus any local taxes), […]

Index Skip Scan: Potential Use Case or Maybe Not ? (Shine On You Crazy Diamond)

Richard Foote's Blog - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 11:57
While answering a recent question on a LinkedIn forum, it got me thinking whether there’s a potential use case for using an INDEX SKIP SCAN I hadn’t previously considered. I’ve discussed Index Skip Scans previously (as I did here), a feature introduced around Oracle9i that allows an index to be considered by the CBO even […]

Announcement: Oracle Indexing Internals Seminars Coming to New Zealand in March 2018 (Shipyards of New Zealand)

Richard Foote's Blog - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 01:14
I’m very pleased to announce I’ve now finalised some dates in New Zealand for my popular and highly acclaimed “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” seminar. They are: Wellington 12-13 March 2018: Tickets and Registration Link Auckland 15-16 March 2018: Tickets and Registration Link As usual, numbers will be strictly limited due to the small class nature […]

Quick SQL: from Packaged App to built-in feature in Oracle APEX 5.2

Dimitri Gielis Blog - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 10:26
I blogged about Quick SQL already a few times as I saw not many developers knew about it.

In Oracle APEX 5.1 you can install Quick SQL by going to the Packaged Apps section and install it from there:

I really love Quick SQL as it allows me to build my data model very fast, but also shows me the structure of the tables in a very efficient way. That is why I created a script that can reverse engineer existing tables into the Quick SQL format.
From Oracle APEX 5.2 onwards you won't find Quick SQL in the packaged app section anymore... but no worries, it's not gone, it's now built-in the APEX framework itself :)
Go to SQL Workshop - SQL Scripts:

Hit the Quick SQL button:

Here you have Quick SQL :)

You can run your script after you save, straight from this interface.
Note: the screenshots are taken from Oracle APEX 5.2 Early Adopter, so things might change in the final release of APEX 5.2.

Visual Studio Code Extensions I use

Dimitri Gielis Blog - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 13:46
In my post List of the tools I use and why I use them I already mentioned I use Visual Studio Code as my main editor. Before I used different editors, but VSC replaced them all (core + extensions), so it's easier for me to just use one editor. Next to that, VSC is controlled by a company, gets monthly updates and there's a huge community behind it that provide extensions.

Here's a screenshot of the updates in version 1.19

These are the extensions I've installed:

If you want to search for those extensions this list might be easier:
  • DavidAnson.vscode-markdownlint
  • DotJoshJohnson.xml
  • HookyQR.minify
  • PKief.material-icon-theme
  • PeterJausovec.vscode-docker
  • Shan.code-settings-sync
  • alefragnani.project-manager
  • anseki.vscode-color
  • apng.orclapex-autocomplete
  • buianhthang.xml2json
  • christian-kohler.npm-intellisense
  • christian-kohler.path-intellisense
  • dbaeumer.vscode-eslint
  • donjayamanne.githistory
  • eamodio.gitlens
  • eg2.vscode-npm-script
  • formulahendry.auto-close-tag
  • formulahendry.code-runner
  • gerane.Theme-Blackboard
  • humao.rest-client
  • johnpapa.azure-functions-tools
  • kisstkondoros.vscode-codemetrics
  • mdickin.markdown-shortcuts
  • ms-vscode.azure-account
  • ms-vscode.Theme-MarkdownKit
  • ms-vscode.wordcount
  • msjsdiag.debugger-for-chrome
  • nodesource.vscode-for-node-js-development-pack
  • rafaelmaiolla.remote-vscode
  • robertohuertasm.vscode-icons
  • streetsidesoftware.code-spell-checker
  • wix.vscode-import-cost
  • xyz.plsql-language
If you install the Shell Command Line of VSC you can get the list of extensions by typing: code --list-extensions

In the Oracle APEX community many people are using Visual Studio Code, you can read a nice article of Morten; Using VS Code for PL/SQL development and Christope; Compile PL/SQL with VS Code using SSH. Adrian also created a nice extension for Oracle APEX. I highlighted the two extensions above.

Other editors that are often being used by Oracle APEX developers are Sublime Text and Atom, which have similar features than VSC, so if you read something nice that those editors can do, you can do it in Visual Studio Code most likely too e.g. Jorge's excellent post about Multi-Cursor Editing or Martin's truth about developing with Atom.

Just as a reminder for myself, As there were too many extensions to fit on one screen, I took two screenshots and glued the files together with following command:
convert -append vscode_1.png vscode_2.png vscode_extensions.png
If you wanted to glue them horizontally, you can use +append (I'm on a Mac).

Early Bird Extension – UK February Dates: “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” Seminar

Richard Foote's Blog - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 06:49
As a Christmas present to those in the UK looking at attending my “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” seminar in February next year, the Early Bird rates are now available until 19th January 2018. Take this opportunity to attend this highly acclaimed seminar that is packed full of information designed to significantly improve the […]

Reverse engineer existing Oracle tables to Quick SQL

Dimitri Gielis Blog - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 20:01
If you didn't hear about Oracle Quick SQL, it's time to read about it as it's something you have without knowing (it's a packaged app in Oracle APEX) and I believe you should start using :)

Quick SQL enables you to rapidly design and prototype data models using a markdown-like shorthand syntax that expands to standards-based Oracle SQL. You can easily create master detail relationships, check constraints, and even generate sample data.
In my blog post Create the Oracle database objects I go over the history how I created database objects and why I think Quick SQL is great and why I use it.

I guess most people typically use Quick SQL at the start of a new project, as it's the quickest way to create your data model and Oracle database objects. That is my primary use case too, but I started to use Quick SQL even on projects where database objects already exist.

In the project I'm currently involved in, the datamodel was generated by another tool, but as we iterate through the project, tables change, columns get renamed and added, row version were requested, triggers need to be made Oracle APEX aware...

Now we could do those changes manually, but I thought it made much more sense to create the data model in Quick SQL and use the features that come with Quick SQL. By clicking a checkbox we can include a Row version, Quick SQL generates the triggers automatically in an APEX aware form, we can generate as much sample data as we want by adding /insert and we can use all the other features that come with Quick SQL. For example when you want to include a history table in the future it's just another checkbox to click.

It's also easy to check-in the Quick SQL script into source control, together with the generated DDL.
If changes need to be done, we can adapt in Quick SQL and generate the DDL again and we see the changes immediately. It would be nice if Quick SQL could generate the ALTER statements too, but that's not the case yet. But it's easy enough to see the changes that were done by comparing the scripts in source control.

If you also want to reverse engineer an existing model into Quick SQL, here's a script that gives you a head start generating the markdown style format.

I tried the script on the Quick SQL data model itself - the result you see below:

Hopefully you see the benefit of using Quick SQL in existing projects too and the script helps you get there. Also Quick SQL gets frequent updates - in the upcoming release (17.3.4), which is already online, you can add a Security Group ID to every table (to make your app multi-tenant) and you can rename the audit columns to your own naming conventions.
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